How to Buy a Tent (and Used Things in General)

Tents are really expensive here. The cheapest one I could find was at Limpopo for 25,000 tenge ($165 CAD). And it’s bright orange, which doesn’t work for the purposes of stealth/wild camping. I’d be open to investing in a good tent but I’ll be ditching this one at the end of the summer.

Thus, I turned to Slando, the Russian equivalent of Craigslist. Searching can only be done in Russian, though they make it easy to find ads with picture categories. I did all the messaging with the seller of my tent in Russian, since my written skills are decent, and then asked my co-worker/friend, Madina, to phone for me once I decided to make a purchase. Though I’m making person to person progress, a phone call is beyond my expertise.

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Welcome to KZ! In Ust-Kamenogorsk

The tents in Astana were still expensive so I also checked listings for Ust-Kamenogorsk because I knew I’d be there the beginning of May. I found a tent (only 10,000 tenge!) and told the seller the dates I’d be in town and he said that was A-okay. He was actually busy working every day I was in Ust and so I gave the cash to Madina, who was staying longer so she could pick it up.

It turns out this guy didn’t just have one tent to sell – he runs a tent business on the side and he had temporarily run out. He proposed meeting with Madina to get the cash and then as soon as some tents came in, he’d put one on a bus to Astana. Then I’d meet with the bus driver at the station and give him 500 tenge for his troubles. I gave it all the go-ahead because, it’s Kazakhstan.

The seller let Madina know on Saturday that he’d put the tent on the bus and I left my house at 6am on Sunday morning to bike to the station to meet the bus driver, who was scheduled to arrive some time between 7-8am.

When I got to the bus station, I texted with the driver alright but when he phoned me, I told him, “Sorry, I don’t understand very much,” so he thought he had the wrong number. So when he phoned again I tried a different tactic of saying, “Sorry, I’m an American lady but I want the tent!” And then he understood and all was well.

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Now I have a tent.

And here are some photos from Ust-Kamenogorsk. It’s Madina’s hometown, super east in Kazakhstan, close to Russia and China. Lots of trees, mountains, and a nice river. I’ve heard mountain treks in that region are pretty amazing, though I think you have to go by tour which is a bit $.

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Our apartment fell through but then Madina phoned 3 other people to get a new one

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I love staying in Kazakh apartments for the crazy wallpaper

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Ust has a park with old airplanes, a series of progressively bigger Lenin statues, a laneway of houses – one from each ethnic group that lives in Ust (which was really cool), and other random things

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Madina used to work at the local library and it was totally amazing. They do a lot of work with the community. They’re the only public library in Kazakhstan with wifi and their shelves became open access three years ago (the library I work at was the first in KZ to have open shelves but we’re on a closed campus….).

All in all, a very nice city! More ethnically/culturally/landscape-y diverse than Astana. Because of the distance, I’d probably only recommend going there if you’re here long-term – it’s a good getaway for 3 or more days. If only everyone who went could also experience the best manti I’ve had in KZ, made by Madina’s mom (not pictured because I was too busy eating).

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