How to Run a Half-Marathon

The only officially organized race that I know of in the two major cities of Astana and Almaty, is the annual Almaty Marathon. Though I hear that Air Astana will be putting a race on in Astana this September.

I had thought about running the half-marathon portion of the Great Wall race, with a friend, but those plans fell through a while back. So when the Almaty race came up, I was already mentally prepared to sign up.

The idea of a race has always intimidated me. I don’t even like running with friends (it was the only time I felt cranky on my trip to Japan) so the idea of running in a crowd is hugely unappealing. But because of its smaller size, the Almaty race felt like the right one to sign up for. Plus, I love Almaty and it’s always fun to go there with friends.

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Some Uzbek plates I saw on this trip since y’all seem to love them so much 🙂

Preparation

I’ve been running (okay let’s be real, jogging) at least twice a week for the past two and a half years, except for the many times I injured myself and had to temporarily stop. People assume because I’m tall and slim that I’m a natural runner. But the sports doctor I saw about my recurring shin splints told me that my body isn’t really meant for running – the load of it being too much for my shins to bear.

I think a lot of that is bullshit in the sense that I can run decently but I just have to be mindful (and I’ll happily use the diagnosis as an excuse to never run a full marathon). After a lot of physio, the right shoes, and finally getting my groove, I started hitting my stride in Astana. Likely, because it’s the best cure I’ve found for all those frustratingly bureaucratic or lonely days.

Once I signed up for the race last fall, I began running four times a week and did pilates and soccer once or twice a week. I never ran more than three days in a row. I did one fast 3-5k run, an easy 5-8, some sort of interval training run between 5-8k, and a long run between 10-18 (I peaked at 18k). Many thanks to running/librarian friends, Shannon and Lindsay for helping me craft a casual training plan!

I do physio exercises before each run (15 minutes) and I’ve found these really help prevent injury. For longer runs, I sometimes tape my right shin and left ankle. I wouldn’t be surprised if I’m doing it incorrectly and it’s just a placebo effect that helps. Whatever works!

Soundtrack

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My friend, Megan, said that she runs without her phone and runs as long and as fast as she feels. Spirit runs! I could never do this.

I like running best to podcasts. In Vancouver, I would sometimes run to Songza playlists (1993 rap and Dreampop). But Songza isn’t available outside of North America and I have a very minimal music collection, so podcasts it is.

I find that music is too familiar or repetitive to fully take my mind off of running. Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History and Marc Maron’s WTF are generally engrossing enough to put me in the right headspace. It was especially fun to listen to the Hardcore History series on Ghengis Khan while running along the steppe.

Apps

My friend, and spirit runner (though he would never call it that), Sean, said his body tells him exactly how fast and far he needs to go. I roll my eyes in jealousy and continue to use apps to track how all over the place my pace is.

I’ve been using RunKeeper since I started running but I’ve recently switched over to Strava, simply because one of my best pals uses it. I dislike that Strava doesn’t let you program intervals but I felt that for race day it would be best, because it tells you the pace of your previous km and I thought that would be most helpful for keeping track.

Race Day Strategy

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My goal was to run in under two hours. I would’ve been so happy even at 1:59:59.

I planned to run the first 5k (5:50-5:55/km) at a slower pace, the next 12.5k at a slightly faster pace (5:40), and the last 3.6k as fast as possible. It meant I should hit 5k by 29:35 minutes in, 10k by 58, 15k by 86, and 17 by 94.

I’d never used energy gels before but I tried a couple on longer training runs and reserved two to use during the race (one before the start and one halfway through).

I have to pee all the time, so I planned to wake up super early and hydrate and stop an hour before the race. I also felt nervous about hydrating during the race since I normally don’t bring water on my runs but Shannon convinced me that I really need to hydrate during such a long run. So I decided to grab cups at a few water stations and sip as much down as I could without choking.

Race Day

I ate a whole bunch of spicy Korean food the night before, which was totally cool with my iron stomach but not so great for my fellow racing friends. Woke up early to hydrate, had half a banana and some pomegranate juice and took an energy gel 30 minutes before the race started.

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Fresh-squeezed Tashkent (yellow) pomegranates

There were four of us running the race. Jack and I didn’t want to show up that much earlier than the race start time but Sean told us that races are always so chaotic that you do need to show up early.

I really had to pee by the time we got to the race site but we couldn’t find toilets anywhere so I peed by a pile of rocks. I would’ve loved to have gone again right before the start of the race but there was no way that was happening with all the crowds.

The Race

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All I knew for sure was that I had shaved my legs

It. Was. So. Hot. During the race it peaked at 27 degrees. There was snow in Astana up until a couple of weeks ago. And I’m the type of person who runs in short shorts and a tank top when it’s 10 degrees out and still get overheated.

By 6k I totally abandoned my pacing plan and started run/walking. I really hated to walk because I never do on my day-to-day runs but I knew if I pushed myself too much, I would burn out way before the end and be fully walking. I stopped at almost all the water stations, if only to pour it over my head (I was totally soaked by the finish line). And I had no qualms about stopping to pee once I spotted some toilets without a big line.

I finished with a time of 2:17:40, 60/351 women who did the half. And I’m left feeling like it was a respectable first try (average time for ladies worldwide is 2:19), I’m really glad I did it, and I’d like to do another half next year. From the last 5k until I finished the race I was thinking, “Never again!” But now I’ve experienced the same symptoms as post-partum women and a layer of vaseline softens my memory of the race.

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I may not have met goal #1 but I did meet goal #2 to not poop my pants.

Things I Learned

  • Ideally, my first race would’ve been in the city I live and have already been running in.
  • I will never run a race again when it’s anticipated that the temperature will go well above 15 degrees.
  • Listening to a podcast on race day was totally the wrong choice for me. I’m so glad that I downloaded ABBA Gold at the last minute.
  • French-braided pigtails was a wise (ie. secure) hair choice.
  • Listening to my body in the moment was also a good choice.
  • Chocolate flavoured energy gels are kind of gross – I think I’d go with fruit next time.

I was pretty impressed with how well-organized this specific race was! The starting could definitely be better managed. And I would never bring a bag to pick up afterwards again (I think it took over 15 minutes to find it). But overall, pretty decent.

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Last flight for a while!

 

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